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It feels like the right thing to do to put something back from the success of Baker Consultants, so each year we donate to a charity or a project somehow connected with our locality or the ecology industry. Fresh clean water, a basic amenity for us but a precious resource nonetheless and scarce in many parts of the world seemed an appropriate cause.

We have chosen to donate to Aquabox a charity run by the Rotary Club of Wirksworth.

Aquabox was set up to assist relief agencies in disaster areas to supply safe drinking water from the existing supplies of local often contaminated water.

We chose to sponsor the AquaFilter Community box, which is a system capable of generating up to 500,000 litres of drinking water from the local contaminated water sources. This is enough basic drinking water for 100 families of 6 (600 people) for well over a year and half; over 500 tonnes of drinking water.

Aquabox

 

If you would like more information on Aquabox please click here

 

Baker Consultants is taking part in the WildVolunteering Award, a partnership between Derby City Council, the University of Derby and WildDerby for students at the University. We have proposed a project to use electronic detectors to survey and monitor for nightjar (a bird species of high nature conservation concern).

 

The role of the student would be to receive training in the use of Wildlife Acoustics SM2 bird detectors, deploy these on a site local to Cromford, and then download and analyse the data gathered to check for recordings of nightjar song.  The project would be supported by ecologists within Baker Consultants, but the student would be expected to undertake the fieldwork independently and carry out computer analysis of the data.

Nightjars sing (churr) between mid-May and mid-August, with a peak in activity during June.  They are normally surveyed by people walking transects at dusk and dawn, while listening for the distinctive song produced by male birds.  We would like to test the use of automatic recording equipment (often used for bats) which can be programmed, placed in the field and left to record for a period of nights.  Once the survey period is complete, the electronic data is downloaded and can then be analysed using computer software to check for singing nightjars.

 

There are over 50 places on the WildVolunteering scheme open to students of Derby University. Students have the opportunity to gain valuable work experience and an insight into the biodiversity and ecology of the region.

Further details of the WildVolunteering scheme can be found at the weblink here:

http://www.derby.ac.uk/community/projects/wildvolunteering-2013